Automatic water changer 
Nifty siphon overflow device, originally based on an idea from http://waynesworldangelfish.com/automated_water_changes.htm but I changed it to use a rigid acrylic tube.

The tee and elbow set the water level.  By sliding it up and down, the tank fill level can be set.  You can see the rigit Acrylic siphon tube going from inside the tank to the overflow holder.

This tank is free-standing.  I do something slightly different on the other tanks.
Nifty siphon overflow device, originally based on an idea from http://waynesworldangelfish.com/automated_water_changes.htm but I changed it to use a rigid acrylic tube.

The tee and elbow set the water level. By sliding it up and down, the tank fill level can be set. You can see the rigit Acrylic siphon tube going from inside the tank to the overflow holder.

This tank is free-standing. I do something slightly different on the other tanks.
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Another shot of the overflow device, in a different configuration.  The black pipe slides into a riser on the drain pipe.  The water then flows away due to gravity.  The black pipe fits snugly into the 1/2 inch white PVC, so I can slide the device up/down to set the fill level very precisely.   There is a small spacer to keep it vertical, I plan to use sticky pads to hold it in place later.
Another shot of the overflow device, in a different configuration. The black pipe slides into a riser on the drain pipe. The water then flows away due to gravity. The black pipe fits snugly into the 1/2 inch white PVC, so I can slide the device up/down to set the fill level very precisely. There is a small spacer to keep it vertical, I plan to use sticky pads to hold it in place later.
Viewed: 2700 times.

Another overflow device shot.  You can see the overhead water feed line too.
Another overflow device shot. You can see the overhead water feed line too.
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The overflow device from inside the tank.  Here you can see the rigid siphon tube and the nylon strainer glued on the end (hot-melt glue).  I really didn't want any fry disappearing down there.

Unfortunately, the flash glare is exactly over the outlet of the drain tee.  You could see the relationship between the water level and the black overflow outlet.
The overflow device from inside the tank. Here you can see the rigid siphon tube and the nylon strainer glued on the end (hot-melt glue). I really didn't want any fry disappearing down there.

Unfortunately, the flash glare is exactly over the outlet of the drain tee. You could see the relationship between the water level and the black overflow outlet.
Viewed: 2301 times.

Shot of the overhead water feed with a 1GPH dripper.  These are supposed to be pressude compensating, so that they flow at roughly the same rate regardless of the incoming line pressure.  The outflow tube from the dripper goes to the top of the tank.  Beware of creating a reverse siphon here!  Dont put the outlet under water.
Shot of the overhead water feed with a 1GPH dripper. These are supposed to be pressude compensating, so that they flow at roughly the same rate regardless of the incoming line pressure. The outflow tube from the dripper goes to the top of the tank. Beware of creating a reverse siphon here! Dont put the outlet under water.
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Ugh. Plumbing.  The top pipe  is the gravity drain for the overflow devices.  You can see one with its drain pipe sticking into the 1/2 inch PVC pipe.  The open air was an experiment to stop the gurgling noise and to be sure I didn't get any airlocks.
Ugh. Plumbing. The top pipe is the gravity drain for the overflow devices. You can see one with its drain pipe sticking into the 1/2 inch PVC pipe. The open air was an experiment to stop the gurgling noise and to be sure I didn't get any airlocks.
Viewed: 2300 times.

The gravity drains feed into this 10 gallon bucket.  You can see the float switch (from a utility sump pump at the hardware store) and a submersible aquarium pump inside (a heck of a lot quieter than a utility pump!!).  This bucket is below the drain, so I had to use a pump.
The gravity drains feed into this 10 gallon bucket. You can see the float switch (from a utility sump pump at the hardware store) and a submersible aquarium pump inside (a heck of a lot quieter than a utility pump!!). This bucket is below the drain, so I had to use a pump.
Viewed: 2780 times.

Top (outlet) of the 6-foot tall carbon filter.

This is the real gem of the system, based on an idea from Lee Harper.  In goes plain tap water, out comes clear water, with NO CHLORINE OR CHLORAMINE!  No chemicals are added.  Since it hasn't been through RO/DI, I dont need to re-add the electrolytes and buffers.  I do not know why it removes chloramine, everything I had read before made me believe carbon would not remove it.  But this mother-of-all-filters gives me zero readings.

That is a 2-inch diameter pipe filled with "Norit PK 1-3" activated carbon.  There is foam inside the plug ends to stop the carbon escaping.
Top (outlet) of the 6-foot tall carbon filter.

This is the real gem of the system, based on an idea from Lee Harper. In goes plain tap water, out comes clear water, with NO CHLORINE OR CHLORAMINE! No chemicals are added. Since it hasn't been through RO/DI, I dont need to re-add the electrolytes and buffers. I do not know why it removes chloramine, everything I had read before made me believe carbon would not remove it. But this mother-of-all-filters gives me zero readings.

That is a 2-inch diameter pipe filled with "Norit PK 1-3" activated carbon. There is foam inside the plug ends to stop the carbon escaping.
Viewed: 2290 times.

Bottom (inlet) of the carbon filter.  Note that the water flows UP so that gravity will keep the carbon together.  I was worried about it settling and a gap/tunnel making its way along the top of the pipe if it was laying on its side, allowing the chlorine/chloramine to bypass it.

The end cap is a female inspection adapter, with a male 2-inch screw-in plug.  I drilled a hole in the plug and tapped it with a 3/4 inch pipe thread tap.  Then I screwed in a 3/4 -> 1/2 inch reducing adapter with a mixture of solvent on its thread to make sure that it bonded well and there were no leaks.  Turns out this was the most water-tight part of the entire project....
Bottom (inlet) of the carbon filter. Note that the water flows UP so that gravity will keep the carbon together. I was worried about it settling and a gap/tunnel making its way along the top of the pipe if it was laying on its side, allowing the chlorine/chloramine to bypass it.

The end cap is a female inspection adapter, with a male 2-inch screw-in plug. I drilled a hole in the plug and tapped it with a 3/4 inch pipe thread tap. Then I screwed in a 3/4 -> 1/2 inch reducing adapter with a mixture of solvent on its thread to make sure that it bonded well and there were no leaks. Turns out this was the most water-tight part of the entire project....
Viewed: 2112 times.

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